John Perkins

 Lanyards! How To Make Lanyard Crosses Lanyards!

Lanyard crosses made from straight 4-string lanyards are the most basic form of joining 2 or more lanyards together.   The bottom 4 images in the Lanyard Gallery are all based off of this idea.   If you can make a Lanyard Cross, you've opened up an incredible number of new possibilities.

Lanyard crossses don't necessarily have to be made with 4-string lanyards, or with straight stitches.   The joining stitches will be a bit more difficult, but should still work with any number of strings.

The pictures on this page all have their brightness turned way up in order to show detail with the black string.
Lanyards!
Make 2 separate 4-string lanyards, one of them with 7 stitches, the other with 14 stitches.

The 7 / 14 / 7 / 7 pattern I use is of course a matter of choice.   It just happens to look right to me, and it's the way I was taught, so i'm happy with it.   If you're not, by all means, use whatever combination you want.

Lanyards!
Point the 2 lanyards at each other.  If what you have looks like this picture, do this step.   If not, skip to the next step.

See how there are 2 rows of silver stitches on each lanyard?   See how, in this picture, the silver strings are both coming out of the top row?   If your 2 lanyards look like this, add one extra stitch to the 14-stitch lanyard.

Lanyards!
Point the 2 lanyards at each other again.   See how, in this picture, the silver strings are coming out of different rows?   This is the way it should look.

This is the hard part of making Lanyard Crosses.   This stitch and the next one require some dexterity.

Lanyards!
Send the 2 silver strings across.

Holding the 2 lanyards at this point is a bit tricky.   If you hold one lanyard and the silver string from the other, you can keep them together with one hand.

Lanyards!
Send 2 of the black strings across, over-and-under, just like a regular 4-string lanyard.

The important thing to remember here is to use the 2 black strings closest to the silver strings you're using.

Lanyards!
Pull the stitch you just made reasonably snug.

There isn't really anything holding the 2 lanyards together right now, so this stitch will be very loose.   If you set the whole thing down, the 2 lanyards will probably just fall away from each other.

Lanyards!
Make another stitch on top of the loose one you just made.

Lanyards!
Tighten that stitch.

This should tighten both this stitch and the loose one underneath.

Lanyards!
Keep going in this direction until you have 7 stitches.   I don't count the loose stitch here since the loose stitch is sort of diagonal.

Lanyards!
Now you can start on the other side.

You're using the 4 strings you've been leaving alone so far.   The silver strings go straight across, then the black strings over-and-under.

Lanyards!
Continue the 2nd side until you have 7 stitches, just like the first side.   Once you've done this, the cross-ish part of the Lanyard Cross is done.   All that's left to do is finish off the ends.

I don't count this side's loose stitch either, since it's also diagonal.

Finishing Off The Ends

This is the page for making Lanyard Crosses, but finishing the ends is the same for any kind of lanyard.   You should only 'finish off the ends' on the ends where strings are coming out.   The ends where the lanyard started hold themselves together and don't need finishing.

There is a bit of choice involved here- use whatever kind of glue you want, whether or not to use fire.   I've always used plain old Elmer's Glue.   I thought about trying Superglue, but i'm always worried about permanently bonding myself to one of my lanyards.

Choose to use fire at your own risk.   If you leave your kids unattended and they burn the house down as a result of these instructions, it's your own darned fault.   Kids, have your parents read this first and give you permission before you do anything at all with fire.

Lanyards!
On the last stitch, put a dab of glue.   Not a giant glob like I have here.   Just enough to spread around on the end.   If you do get a glob, don't worry- just wipe the extra away.

Lanyards!
Add a bit of glue underneath each string.   Make sure it gets squished in under where the string comes out.   Wait for the glue to dry if you can.   It's not absolutely necessary, but it helps.   I didn't wait because I wanted to get the pictures finished before dark.

Lanyards!
Fingernail clippers!   You can use a knife or scissors, but fingernail clippers are by far the most convenient tool for this part.

Clip each of the strings off so the part of the string coming out of the lanyard is flush with the side of the lanyard.

Lanyards!
The end will look something like this now.

This is the point (kids:   ask your parents!) you may choose to use fire.   The best for me is a lighter used in a non-windy setting.   With the Lanyard Cross here, I only had matches and wind, so I was more in danger of burning my fingers than anything else.   So I didn't use them in this case.   Look through the Lanyard Gallery- you'll see some of the ends look a little burnt.

The goal here is to sort of lightly melt the end of the lanyard, just enough to get the string ends in the last stitch to bond a bit better.   Just the end of the lanyard- if you try to melt the whole thing, you'll have a very nice lump of molten plastic and no lanyard.

The lanyard material may be flammable, not like det cord [sic] or anything, but the flame may try to grow a bit.   If it gets uncomfortably large (moves at all beyond right where you're holding the lighter), just put it out and try again.

Lanyards!
Repeat the finishing process for the other side of the Lanyard Cross.

Lanyards!
Your result should look something like this.